Separate But Same

Today, as I sat waiting, I combed through my coupon organizer, a blue plastic expandable folder. Miya and I had arranged to meet. She arrived and upon seeing me, produced an almost identical blue plastic folder. Eerie, right?

Our childhood photographs look very similar as well, despite the fact that she grew up in New York state and I, in Tennessee. Little square Polaroids of each of us playing with our siblings in our adoptive families.

We have been comparing our baby albums and our adoption letters and papers. Having seen her adoption paper cover, signed by one John W. Bligh, Jr., I remarked at how similar it was to mine. Of course all this was from memory.

Last week, I invited her husband and her children to our home so that the families could finally meet. My boy took her boy and wandered to his room. My girl took her girl and disappeared into her room. The men sat on the sofa and chatted.

Miya and I began looking at our legal adoption papers, side by side. I presented the thin tissue paper packet that sealed my adoption.  On the top was my Certificate of Acknowledgement, signed by the same John W. Bligh, Jr., the Vice Consul of the United States. “Strange,” we remarked.

Then, the date … my paper was signed on the 6th of December 1968, and hers was signed on the 9th of December 1968.

Two girls adopted in the same week in Seoul now sat as women, reunited by all of our commonalities.

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3 thoughts on “Separate But Same

  1. Tylar

    I came across a little tiny blue folder stashed in some cabinet in my garage. I was being nosey and went looking through it and found that it has my mom’s birth certificate. I was curious to know if the guy that signed her birth was important and googled his name. Your blog popped up and I had to share the similarities. Her birth was also recorded in December 1968, on the 23rd. I guess that would be when her life really just started too. My mom came to America with her American dad and Korean mom after the war. Four years later, her father walked out on my grandma who still was learning the “American” way. These two women are the most important things to me, and you have quite a few things in common, so I wish you well!

    Reply

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